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SPORTSBRIEFING

Nadal off Triple Crown trail

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Nadal, one of trainer Bob Baffert’s early favorites for the rescheduled Triple Crown, injured his ankle after a workout at Santa Anita on Thursday and is out of contention for the series.

The 3-year-old colt suffered a left front condylar fracture, Baffert said in a phone interview. It was diagnosed after Nadal completed a half-mile workout in 48.80 seconds. He had surgery during which two screws were inserted in his ankle at the track’s equine hospital.

“He looked good doing it,” Baffert said of the workout. “He got back to the barn and you could tell he was a little bit off. We X-rayed his left ankle. He’s got the start of a condylar fracture, a little faint line. There’s no damage, it’s not displaced.”

Condylar fractures are a repetitive strain injury that results in a fracture to the cannon bone above the fetlock due to large loads during high-speed workouts. They were once considered career-ending injuries, though advances in technology now help with a full recovery and horses can return to competition.

Baffert said Nadal could return to racing after a 90-day recovery period. However, he would miss the Belmont Stakes on June 20, the Kentucky Derby on Sept. 5 and the Preakness on Oct. 3. Baffert wasn’t sure if the colt’s owners would retire him.

The colt is undefeated in four career starts with earnings of $1,053,000.

Royals not in Kansas CIty

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The Kansas City Royals have moved — not actually, but legally.

The Royals changed their legal home from Missouri to Delaware last fall during the process of the team’s sale from David Glass to a group headed by John Sherman. The switch was mentioned Monday in a filing with the 9th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals by Major League Baseball’s law firm in its defense of a lawsuit by minor leaguers claiming they are not being paid minimum wage.

Kansas City Royals Baseball Corp., a Missouri corporation, had been a defendant in the suit, which was filed in 2014. That company filed a certificate of conversion with the Missouri secretary of state on Nov. 19 to convert to Kansas City Royals Baseball Club Inc., a Delaware corporation. Then the newly named corporation converted to Kansas City Royals Baseball Club LLC, a Delaware limited liability company.

Sherman’s group acquired 100% of Kansas City Royals Baseball Club LLC on Nov. 25, a deal thought to be valued at $1 billion. The LLC becomes a defendant in the suit.

An unopposed motion to substitute parties was filed by Proskauer Rose.

Many entities maintain a legal base in Delaware. The Royals have a Class A minor league team in Wilmington

“Corporate laws are much more universal in Delaware,” Royals spokesman Mike Swanson said.

Jason Terry in Arizona again

TUSCON, Ariz. — Former University of Arizona star Jason Terry is headed back to the desert.

Arizona hired Terry as an assistant basketball coach Thursday, filling a hole on Sean Miller’s staff after Justin Gainey left to become Marquette’s associate head coach.

“My family and I are excited to be part of the incredible Tucson community again, where our story began,” Terry said in a statement. “I am looking forward to joining coach Miller and staff to develop student-athletes that have a passion for education, basketball excellence and community leadership.”

Terry won a national championship with Arizona in 1997 and became one of six men’s basketball players to have his jersey number rhung in the rafters at McKale Center.

Terry played under Hall of Fame coach Lute Olson from 1995-99, averaging 21.9 points, 5.5 assists, 3.3 rebounds and 2.8 steals as a senior. He went on to play 19 NBA seasons with Atlanta, Dallas, Boston, Brooklyn, Houston and Milwaukee.

He was named assistant general manager for the Texas Legends of the NBA G-League in 2019.

John Deere Classic canceled

SILVIS, Ill. (AP) — Two weeks before the PGA Tour is set to resume its schedule, John Deere Classic officials decided Thursday to cancel what would have been the fifth tournament back.

Tournament director Clair Peterson said there were too many obstacles to overcome involving too many risks from the COVID-19 pandemic, and that it made financial sense in the long run to not hold the tournament.

The John Deere would have been July 9-12, the fifth PGA Tour stop under the revised schedule. The tour is not allowing spectators for at least a month, meaning the Deere could have been the first tournament that allowed fans.

“Any version — an event with fans, without fans, something in between — we’re going to lose money,” Peterson said. “Or do we want to take the long view of this and ensure long-term security.”

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